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KNOW YOUR VOTING RIGHTS

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August 6, 2024 Primary Election &
November 5, 2024 General Election

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Voting In Person on Election Day
Voting In Person Before Election Day
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CAN I VOTE?

Who can vote?

Most people who will be 18 or older on Election Day can vote if they have registered to vote. 

 

You can register to vote in Michigan if:

  • You are a U.S. citizen.

  • You have been a resident of a city or township in Michigan for at least 30 days (or will be by Election Day).

  • You are at least 17 and a half years old.

  • You are not currently serving a sentence in jail or prison.

 

People who have a guardian can register to vote as long as they meet the requirements listed above 

 

If you are between 16 and 17 and a half years old, and you meet the other requirements listed above, you can pre-register to vote. Details on pre-registering are in Section 2.

I'm a student. Can I vote?

Yes, students who meet the eligibility requirements above can register to vote, even if they are not from Michigan.

  • If you're from Michigan, and you go to school in Michigan, you can register to vote using your school address or home address.

  • If you're from Michigan, and you go to school outside of Michigan, you can register to vote using your home address in Michigan.

  • If you're not from Michigan, but you go to school in Michigan, you can register to vote using your school address in Michigan.

 

The same address needs to be used for your Michigan voter registration and Michigan driver’s license/state ID. This means that if you use a different address on your voter registration application, the address on your Michigan driver’s license or state ID (if you have one) will be automatically updated to match your voter registration address. The Secretary of State will mail you a sticker with your new address to place on your license or state ID card.

I don't have stable housing. Can I vote?

Yes. Even if you don’t have a home or a stable address, you can register and vote using any of these as your address:

  • a street corner. 

  • a park.

  • a shelter.

  • an advocacy or outreach center.

  • the home of someone else who will accept your mail.

  • any other place where you usually stay.

 

I’m in a psychiatric hospital. Can I vote?

Yes. Psychiatric hospitals must help patients who want to register and vote. You can work with your social worker to register and vote before Election Day by absentee ballot.

I was recently in jail, or I'm in jail now. Can I vote?

Usually, yes. The only time you cannot register and vote is when you are serving a sentence in jail or prison. You can vote even if:

 

  • You have a felony or misdemeanor.

  • You are on probation, parole, or tether.

  • You are awaiting arraignment, trial, or sentencing – whether you are in jail or not.

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Can I Vote?
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HOW CAN I GET READY TO VOTE?

Step 1. Find out if you are registered to vote at the address where you live.

To vote in Michigan, you must be registered at the address where you live. Use Option 1 or Option 2 to find out if you are registered to vote where you currently live:

 

Option 1. Visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Your voter information.” Enter the following information to see if, and where, you are registered to vote:

  • Your first and last name.

  • The month and year you were born.

  • The ZIP code where you currently live.

(You can also search using your driver’s license number and the month and year you were born.)

 

Option 2. Call your city or township clerk’s office. They can tell you if, and where, you are registered to vote.

If you’re already registered to vote where you currently live, no need to do anything else. Just vote when it’s time! If you’re not registered (or if you’re registered at the wrong place), move to Step 2.

Step 2. Register to Vote.

How do I register to vote?

How you register to vote depends on when you register to vote.

If it’s more than 14 days before Election Day, there are many ways to register to vote in the next election.

 

IN PERSON: You can register to vote in person at any of these places:

  • Any Secretary of State branch office.

  • Your city, township, or county clerk’s office.

  • Any state agency that provides public assistance or services to people with disabilities.

  • Any Armed Forces recruitment office.

  • A voter-registration drive.

ONLINE: You can register to vote online at mi.gov/vote. Click on “Register to vote online.” (To register online, you must have a valid Michigan driver’s license or state ID.)

BY MAIL: You can print an application, complete it, and mail it in. Get an application online at mi.gov/vote. Click on “Voter forms and publications.”

Starting 14 days before Election Day (even up to 8 p.m. on Election Day), you can still register and vote in the upcoming election. To do this, visit your city or township clerk’s office, complete a registration application, and provide proof of residency. 

 

Proof of residency is a document with both your name and the address where you currently live. You can use any of the following:

  • A Michigan driver’s license or state ID card.

  • A utility bill.

  • A bank statement.

  • A paycheck.

  • A government check.

  • Any other government document.

If you register to vote fewer than 15 days before Election Day, ask for a registration receipt. Keep this receipt and bring it with you when you go to vote.

Important voter registration deadlines:

August 6 Primary Election:

  • July 22: last day to register to vote online or by mail.

  • July 23: starting today, you’ll need to register in person at your city or township clerk’s office with proof of residency.

 

November 5 General Election:

  • October 21: last day to register to vote online or by mail.

  • October 22: starting today, you’ll need to register in person at your city or township clerk’s office with proof of residency.

How do I pre-register to vote?

If you are between 16 and 17 and a half years old, and you otherwise meet the requirements for registering to vote, you can pre-register to vote. You can pre-register to vote using any of the voter registration methods described above. Once you turn 17 and a half, your pre-registration will automatically turn into a regular registration.

If I’m mailing in my application, where and by when do I need to mail it?

Mail your voter registration application to your city or township clerk. To vote in the next election, your application must be postmarked by 15 days before Election Day.

  • August 6 Primary Election: Have your application postmarked by July 22.

  • November 5 General Election: Have your application postmarked by October 21.

How do I find my city or township clerk’s offices and the hours they are open?

  1. Visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Where are my clerk’s offices?”

  2. Enter your address.

  3. Look for the offices’ hours and locations, including satellite locations. Or use the phone number that’s listed to call and ask for their hours and locations.

 

The hours of city and township clerks’ offices vary. But all city and township clerks’ offices must be open for at least 8 hours the weekend before Election Day and from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day.

Do I need a photo ID or proof of citizenship to register to vote?

No. But here’s what you do need to register to vote:   

 

If you're registering to vote in person, you will be asked for a photo ID. If you don’t have one, you can sign a simple form (called an affidavit) and then register to vote. If you are registering to vote starting 14 days before Election Day, you will also need proof of residency.

If you're registering to vote through the mail, and you have a Michigan driver’s license, Michigan state ID card, or Social Security number, enter those numbers on your voter registration application. If you don’t have any of those things, check the box that says “I don’t have a valid Michigan-issued driver’s license or Michigan-issued state ID card, or a Social Security number” located under the space for writing in numbers.

How Can I Get Ready to Vote?
Proof of Residency
City or Township Clerk
Pre-Reg
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HOW CAN I VOTE?

There are three ways to vote in an election:

 

Each of these options has different requirements, which are explained in this section.

VOTING FROM HOME BEFORE ELECTION DAY

You can vote from home before Election Day using an absentee ballot. This is a ballot that is sent to you, then you complete it at home and return it by a certain date. Using an absentee ballot is a good option if you want to avoid lines at your polling place or early voting site, if you think you might be out of town on Election Day, or if you just want to take your time filling out your ballot.

Step 1: Get your application for an absentee ballot.

If you want to vote from home, and you’re not already on the Permanent Mail Ballot List, you first need to apply for an absentee ballot. Use one of these ways to get an application for an absentee ballot:

  • Call or visit your city or township clerk’s office and ask for an absentee ballot application.

  • Visit mi.gov/vote and fill out an application online by clicking on “Apply for an absentee ballot online.”

  • Visit mi.gov/vote and download and print an application by clicking on “Voter forms and publications” and scrolling down to “Absentee Voter Ballot.”

Step 2: Complete your application for an absentee ballot

If you filled out your application online at mi.gov/vote, you’re all set.

If you choose to use a paper application, fill it out and sign it using your official signature, that is, the signature that you used to sign your driver’s license or your voter registration application. When you complete the application, you will be able to choose whether to have an absentee ballot mailed to you for a specific upcoming election or for all future elections.

Step 3: Turn in your application for an absentee ballot

If you filled out your application online at mi.gov/vote, you’re all set.

 

If you filled out a paper application, you’ll need to submit it to your city or township clerk. You can submit the signed application:

  • In person to your city or township clerk’s office.

  • Using a secure drop box provided by your city or township clerk.

  • By email, mail, or fax.

 

You can track when your application is received by your clerk and when your ballot is mailed to you by visiting mi.gov/vote and clicking on “Your voter information.” If there is no date next to a particular step, it means that step is not yet complete.

Submit your application for an absentee ballot early! You need to apply with enough time for you to receive a ballot, complete it, and return it to your city or township clerk by the deadline. We recommend that you submit your application at least three weeks before Election Day.

Step 4: Vote your absentee ballot

Look for your absentee ballot to arrive in the mail. Once it arrives:

  1. Fill it out.

  2. Place it in the envelope provided.

  3. Sign the outside of the envelope with your official signature, that is, the signature that you used to sign your driver’s license or your voter registration application.

Step 5: Turn in your absentee ballot

Submit your completed ballot to your city or township clerk as soon as possible. Use any of these methods:

  • Send it by mail. Your ballot envelope will come with pre-paid postage, so you don’t need to add a stamp.

  • Drop it off at your city or township clerk's office or in a secure drop box provided by your clerk.

  • Have an immediate family member or a person from your household drop it off for you.

If you can't turn in your completed ballot using any of the above options, you can ask your city or township clerk to pick up your absentee ballot as long as your ballot is in the city or township where you are registered to vote.

 

Alternatively, you can take your completed absentee ballot to your early voting site or, if you live anywhere other than Detroit, to your polling place on Election Day and insert it into a tabulator. Just let the poll workers know that you’d like to do this when you arrive. 

 

In most cases, your completed ballot must be received by your city or township clerk by 8 p.m. on Election Day to count. However, if you are serving in the military or living overseas, your completed ballot must be postmarked by Election Day and received by your city or township clerk within six days after the election.


I am hand-delivering my ballot to my city or township clerk or placing it in a drop box. When does the clerk need to get it?

  • August 6 Primary Election: Ballots are due by 8 p.m. on August 6.

  • November 5 General Election: Ballots are due by 8 p.m. on November 5.

 

I am not serving in the military or living overseas, and I am mailing my ballot. When should I send it?

 

  • August 6 Primary Election: Ballots should be sent no later than July 23.

  • November 5 General Election: Ballots should be sent no later than October 22.

 

I am serving in the military or living overseas. When should I send my ballot and when must my clerk receive it?

 

  • August 6 Primary Election: Ballots must be postmarked by August 6 and received by August 12.

  • November 5 General Election: Ballots must be postmarked by November 5 and received by November 11.

I need to have the clerk pick up my ballot. When do I need to call them?

 

  • August 6 Primary Election: By 5 p.m. on August 2.

  • November 5 General Election: By 5 p.m. on November 1.


What if I need help filling out my absentee ballot application?

Anyone can help you complete the application, but you must sign it yourself, using your official signature, that is, the signature that you used to sign your driver’s license or your voter registration application. If a mark or signature stamp is your official signature, you can use that mark or signature stamp to sign your application.


What if I need help turning in my absentee ballot application?

If you need help returning the application, you can ask an immediate family member or a person from your household to mail it or drop it off for you. If no one from your immediate family or household can help, you can ask any registered voter to return the application for you. The registered voter who returns your application must sign the application form where indicated.


What if I need help filling out my absentee ballot?

If you are a person with a disability or otherwise cannot mark your ballot, you can choose someone to help you fill it out, like a friend or a family member. The person you choose cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your labor union. If someone helps you fill out your ballot, that person must sign where indicated on the outside of the ballot return envelope.


What if I need help turning in my absentee ballot?

If you need help returning your ballot, you can ask an immediate family member or a person from your household to mail or drop it off for you. If no one from your immediate family or household can help, you can ask your city or township clerk to pick up your completed ballot, as long as your ballot is in the city or township where you are registered to vote, and you contact your city or township clerk by 5 p.m. on the Friday before Election Day.

What if I'm on the Permanent Mail Ballot List?

Starting in May 2023, voters could sign up to join the Permanent Mail Ballot List and receive a ballot by mail before all future elections. If you signed up for this list, you do not need to submit another absentee ballot application each time. You will automatically receive a ballot by mail before all future elections.

If you were previously on the list to receive an absentee ballot application before each election, you will receive an application before the next election. You need to complete this application and return it to your city or township clerk in order to receive your absentee ballot. 

How can I join the Permanent Mail Ballot List?

If you would like to automatically receive an absentee ballot before each election, without having to submit a new application each time, you can join the Permanent Mail Ballot List. To join the list, on your next absentee ballot application, simply check the box saying that you would like to automatically receive an absentee ballot for each future election for which you’re eligible.

Any Michigan voter can join the list, but it is best suited for voters who wish to vote from home in every election and who generally receive their absentee ballot at the same address for each election.

 

Can I track my application for an absentee ballot and my absentee ballot?

You can track your absentee ballot and application by visiting mi.gov/vote and clicking on “Your voter information.”

You can see this information:

  • The date your clerk received your application for an absentee ballot.

  • The date your clerk mailed your absentee ballot to you.

  • The date your clerk received your absentee ballot after you mailed or delivered it to your clerk.

 

If there is no date under a specific field, it means that step is not yet complete.

How do I vote by absentee ballot if I’m in a psychiatric hospital?

Have a social worker help you get and complete an absentee ballot application. In section 4 of the application, use the mailing address of the psychiatric hospital, unless you will be released before the election. Be sure to sign the application yourself.

 

When your ballot arrives, fill it out, place it in the envelope provided, and sign the outside of the envelope with your official signature, that is, the signature that you used to sign your driver’s license or your voter registration application, and return the ballot to your city or township clerk.

 

If you have problems voting in a psychiatric hospital, you can contact your hospital’s Office of Recipient Rights or Disability Rights Michigan. To contact Disability Rights Michigan, call 800-288-5923 (TTY: 517-374-4687) or visit DRMich.org.

How do I vote by absentee ballot if I’m in jail?

Work with corrections staff to get an absentee ballot application. You can also speak with the deputy, counselor, or warden if you are having trouble applying for your ballot. If you can’t get assistance from these individuals, ask family or friends to help you exercise your right to vote.

 

When filling out the absentee ballot application, your registration address should be your home address, where you are registered to vote. The mailing address for your ballot should be the address of the facility where you are incarcerated, unless you know for sure you’re going to be released before the election.

 

Voting from jail can take a very long time, so we recommend starting the process as soon as possible.

What if I have my absentee ballot but decide to vote in person? 

If you decide not to vote by mail, you can take your completed absentee ballot to your early voting site or, if you live anywhere other than Detroit, to your polling place on Election Day and let the poll workers know that you would like to feed your absentee ballot into the tabulator. Alternatively, you can give your absentee ballot to the poll worker, and they will give you a new ballot that you can use at the early voting site or polling place.

VOTING IN PERSON BEFORE ELECTION DAY

There are two ways to vote in person before Election Day: at an early voting site or at your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office.

Follow these steps to vote at an early voting site:

If you vote at an early voting site, you will be able to put your ballot into the tabulator, just like on Election Day.

 

STEP 1: Find out when and where early voting is offered for your community. To find this information, visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Your voter information.” You can also call your city or township clerk and ask for this information. Early voting must be offered in all statewide and federal elections for at least nine consecutive days and for eight hours a day, ending the Sunday before Election Day, but some communities will have early voting in additional elections and for additional days and hours.

 

STEP 2: Go to an early voting site for your community and check in with the poll workers. 

 

STEP 3: Complete your ballot, place it in a secrecy sleeve, and feed it into the tabulator–just like you do at your polling place on Election Day.

 

Remember: you have the right to vote if you are in line when your early voting site closes.


Some communities will have early voting for additional days and hours, but early voting must be available for at least the following days and hours:

  • August 6 Primary Election: From Saturday, July 27 through Sunday, August 4 for at least eight hours each day.

  • November 5 General Election: From Saturday, October 26 through Sunday, November 3 for at least eight hours each day.

Follow these steps to vote at your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office:     

If you vote at your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office, you will use an absentee ballot and place it into an envelope to be tabulated later.

STEP 1: Go to your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office. Use one of these ways to find yours:

  • Visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Where are my clerk’s offices.” Enter your address to find your city or township clerk.

  • Call your city or township and ask to be connected to your clerk.

  • Call the nonpartisan Election Protection Hotline at (866) OUR-VOTE | (866) 687-8683.

 

​STEP 2Complete an application for an absentee ballot and give it to the staff.  

 

STEP 3: Complete your ballot, place it in the envelope they give you, sign the outside of the envelope with your official signature, that is, the signature that you use to sign your driver’s license or voter registration form, and submit it to the staff.

Remember: you have the right to receive a ballot if you are in line when your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office closes.

 

I am registered to vote where I live. When can I vote at my city or township clerk’s office?

  • August 6 Primary Election: From June 27 until 4 p.m. on August 5.

  • November 5 General Election: From September 26 until 4 p.m. on November 4.


I still need to register to vote where I live. When can I vote at my city or township clerk’s office?

  • August 6 Primary Election: From June 27 until 8 p.m. on August 6.

  • November 5 General Election: From September 26 until 8 p.m. on November 5.

 

The hours of city and township clerks’ offices vary. But all city and township clerks’ offices must be open at these times:

  • August 6 Primary Election: For at least eight hours the weekend of August 3-4 and 7 a.m. – 8 p.m. on Election Day (August 6).

  • November 5 General Election: For at least eight hours the weekend of November 2-3 and 7 a.m. – 8 p.m. on Election Day (November 5).   

VOTING IN PERSON ON ELECTION DAY

You can vote in person on Election Day. Polling places are open 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. local time, and you have the right to vote if you are in line by 8 p.m. This section answers important questions about voting on Election Day.

Where do I vote on Election Day?

Where you vote depends on if you are already registered to vote.

 

Option 1. You are already registered to vote where you live. If you are already registered to vote where you live, you must vote at your assigned polling place. Here are a few different ways that you can find your polling place: 

  • Visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Your voter information.”

  • Look at your Voter Identification Card.

  • Call your city or township clerk. 

  • Call the nonpartisan Election Protection Hotline at (866) OUR-VOTE | (866) 687-8683.

Option 2. You are not already registered to vote where you live. If you are not registered to vote where you live, you must visit your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office with proof of residency by 8 p.m. on Election Day to register to vote. After you register, you can vote by absentee ballot at your clerk’s office or satellite office, or you can go to your polling place, if there’s time.

Some communities may have Election Day Vote Centers. An Election Day Vote Center is a place where voters can go to register and then get a ballot, fill it out, and feed it into a tabulator. To find out if your community has an Election Day Vote Center, visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Your voter information.”

What if I've moved?

It’s best to update your voter registration as soon as you move. But if you didn’t, you still have options:

 

If you moved to a different city or township:

  • If you moved more than 60 days before Election Day, you must register at your new address and vote in your new city or township.

  • If you moved between 60 and 30 days before Election Day, you can either vote in your old city or township one last time or you can register at your new address and vote in your new city or township.

  • If you moved within 30 days of Election Day, you must vote in your old city or township, because you will not yet be eligible to register at your new address.

 

If you moved to another location in the same city or township: you can register to vote at your new address or you can vote at your old polling place one last time.

How Can I Vote?
Voting From Home Before ED
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HOW CAN I GET HELP VOTING?

I don’t read or write English. How can I get help voting?

If you do not read or write English, here are some options:

 

  • Choose someone to help you vote, like a friend or family member. The person you choose cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your labor union.

  • Get a ballot in your language. There are only a few communities where you can get a ballot in a language other than English.

If you live in Clyde Township, Covert Township, or Fennville, you can get a ballot in Spanish. 

If you live in Hamtramck, you can get a ballot in Bengali or Arabic.

If you live in Dearborn, you can get a ballot in Arabic.


I’m a person with a physical disability. How can I get help voting?

If you are a person with a physical disability, there are several ways for you to vote privately and independently. It can help to make a plan in advance, whether you vote before Election Day or on Election Day.

You can apply for a standard or accessible absentee ballot.

  • To apply for a standard absentee ballot, see Voting From Home Before Election Day for more information.

  • To apply for an accessible absentee ballot, visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Accessible voting.” The accessible ballot allows you to mark the ballot from home, using your own electronic device and assistive technology. After marking the ballot, you will need to print it, sign it using your official signature, that is, the signature that you use to sign your driver’s license or voter registration form, and return the ballot to your local clerk by the deadline for that election. See Voting From Home Before Election Day for more information on how to return your absentee ballot.

You can make sure that your early voting site or polling place is accessible before Election Day.

  • Every clerk’s office, early voting site, and polling place must be accessible to people with disabilities.

  • Every early voting site and polling place should have at least one voting station adapted to allow a person to vote while seated.

  • All voters, including voters with disabilities, should have access to an accessible voting machine called a Voter Assist Terminal. The Voter Assist Terminal helps you mark your ballot with your choices. Once the ballot is marked, the ballot will be printed, and you can insert it into the tabulator to be counted the same way as all other ballots.

If your assigned early voting site or polling place is not accessible, you can call your city or township clerk and ask for an assignment to a site that is accessible. If you are unable to get help from your city or township clerk, call the nonpartisan Election Protection Hotline (866) OUR-VOTE | (866) 687-8683 to report the issue.      

 

If you are unable to enter your early voting site or polling place, you can request curbside voting. Ask someone to go into the early voting site or polling place to ask for curbside voting for you. The workers at your early voting site or polling place will bring a ballot outside so you can vote.

If you have any issues voting, call the nonpartisan Election Protection Hotline at

(866) OUR-VOTE | (866) 687-8683.


Once I’m at my early voting site or polling place, can I ask for help?

Yes, you have the right to help from the election officials. For example, you can ask for help:

  • Getting to the voting booth.

  • Reading or marking your ballot.

  • Using the voting equipment.

 

You can even ask for help after you’ve entered the voting booth if you run into problems.


I’m blind or low vision. How can I get help voting?

If you are blind or low vision, you have a few ways to vote. Remember that you always have the right to assistance and to have a private and independent voting experience.

 

  1. You can take someone with you to help you vote. They can read the ballot to you and write in your votes. The person who helps you vote cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your labor union.

  2. You can use the Voter Assist Terminal. All voters, including voters with disabilities, must have access to an accessible voting machine called a Voter Assist Terminal. The Voter Assist Terminal will help you mark your ballot with your choices. Once the ballot is marked, it will be printed, and you can insert it into the tabulator to be counted the same way as all other ballots.

  3. You can apply for an accessible absentee ballot online. Visit mi.gov/vote and click on “Accessible voting.” The accessible ballot allows you to mark the ballot from home on an electronic device, using your own assistive technology. After completing the ballot, you will need to print it, sign it using your official signature, and return the ballot to your local clerk by the deadline for that election.

I’m deaf or hard of hearing. How can I get help voting?

You can choose someone to help you vote, like a friend or family member. They can read the ballot to you and help you mark the ballot. However, the person you choose cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer or an officer or agent of your labor union.

 

If you have questions or concerns about voting, the National Association of the Deaf has a Voter Information Hotline that can be reached at (301) 818-8683. This hotline offers resources and answers questions related to voting, all in American Sign Language (ASL).


I can’t read or write, or I need help reading or writing. How can I get help voting?

You can choose someone to help you vote, like a friend or family member. They can read the ballot to you and help you mark the ballot. However, the person you choose cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer or an officer or agent of your labor union.

The State of Michigan has an Ombudsperson for Accessible Elections. The

Ombudsperson for Accessible Elections responds to and assists individuals with disabilities who are attempting to vote. To communicate with the Ombudsperson for Accessible Elections, you can call (517) 335-2730 or email ADAVoting@michigan.gov.

 

Voters with disabilities can also contact Disability Rights Michigan for help understanding their voting rights or if someone is interfering with their voting rights. To contact Disability Rights Michigan, call (800) 288-5923 | TTY: (517) 374-4687 or visit DRMich.org.

How can I get help voting?
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WHAT ELSE DO I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT VOTING?

Do I need a photo ID to vote?

No. You have the right to vote in Michigan even if you don’t have a photo ID. If you do have a photo ID, we strongly encourage you to bring it with you to make the process go faster.

 

If you do not have a photo ID or do not have it with you, you can sign a simple form (called an affidavit), and you will be able to vote.

 

A small number of first-time voters who registered through the mail or a voter registration drive will need to provide some type of ID in order to vote. Details are in the next section.

This is my first time voting in Michigan. Do I need an ID to vote?

You may need to provide some type of ID to vote if:

  • This is your first time voting in Michigan, AND

  • You registered to vote through the mail or a voter registration drive, AND

  • You did not provide your Michigan driver’s license number, Michigan state ID number, or Social Security number when you registered to vote.

 

You can use an electronic or paper copy of any of these documents as your ID: 

  • A photo ID. It must include your name, but it does not need to have an address, and the address does not need to be current if it does have an address. Here are some examples:

    • Driver’s license or personal ID card (from any state).

    • High school or college ID.

    • Passport.

    • Military or government-issued photo ID.

    • Tribal ID card.

 

  • A document with your name and current address. Here are some examples:

    • Current utility bill.

    • Bank statement.

    • Paycheck stub.

    • Government check.

    • Any other government document.

Do I need to prove I'm registered to vote?

No. But if you’ve recently registered to vote with your city or township clerk, they may have given you a receipt. If you have this receipt, bring it with you.

Can I use a mark or signature stamp to sign my name?

You should always use your official signature to sign your voter registration form, absentee ballot application, and absentee ballot envelope. You can use a mark or a signature stamp if the mark or signature stamp is your official signature. If you’ll be using a mark or signature stamp for the first time, or if your signature has changed recently, for example because of illness or injury, contact your city or township clerk to find out how to update your official signature before using the new signature on any voting documents.

Can I get time off from work to vote?

Your employer isn’t required to give you paid or unpaid time off to vote. Ask if they have a policy that allows you to take time off. If not, vote before Election Day. 

What will be on the ballot?

You can look at a sample ballot by visiting mi.gov/vote and clicking on “your voter information.”

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What else do I needt know about voting?
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WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I HAVE TROUBLE VOTING?

PROBLEMS WITH YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT

 

What if I requested, but didn’t get, an absentee ballot?

Call your city or township clerk to ask whether they mailed you your ballot. You can find your clerk’s phone number by going to mi.gov/vote and clicking on “Your voter information.”

 

If it is Election Day, or within a few days of Election Day, go to your early voting site (before Election Day) or your polling place (on Election Day) and tell the poll workers that you never received your absentee ballot. They will contact the clerk to confirm you didn’t return your absentee ballot, ask you to sign a form called an affidavit saying that you never received your absentee ballot, and then will give you a new ballot to use at the early voting site or polling place.

What if I received my absentee ballot but then made a mistake filling it out, or I lost or destroyed it?

 

If you need a new ballot before Election Day: Call or visit your city or township clerk’s office as soon as possible. Ask to cancel your first absentee ballot and request a new one. You can also visit your early voting site and tell the poll workers that you need a new ballot.

 

If you still have the first absentee ballot, either because you made a mistake filing it out or it was only partially destroyed, take it with you.

If you need a new ballot on Election Day: Go to your polling place, fill out a simple form (called an affidavit), and vote. If you still have the first absentee ballot, either because you made a mistake filing it out or it was only partially destroyed, take it with you.

What if I received my absentee ballot, but I don’t have enough time to mail it back to my clerk?

Unless you are serving in the military or living overseas, you should put your ballot in the mail at least two weeks before Election Day to ensure that it arrives in time to be counted. If it’s within two weeks of Election Day, return your ballot, using any of these methods:

  • Drop it off at your city or township clerk's office, or satellite office, or in a secure drop box provided by your clerk.

  • Have an immediate family member or a person from your household drop it off for you.

  • If you cannot drop your ballot off or have an eligible person drop it off for you, you can ask your city or township clerk to pick up your completed ballot, as long as your ballot is in the city or township where you are registered to vote and you contact your clerk by 5 p.m. on the Friday before Election Day.

What if I mailed my absentee ballot to my city or township clerk, but I’m concerned it won’t arrive by the deadline?

You can track your absentee ballot by visiting mi.gov/vote and clicking on “Your voter information.” The website will tell you the date that your clerk received your completed absentee ballot.

If the website does not show the date that your clerk received your completed absentee ballot, and it is close to Election Day, you can either go to your early voting site or to your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office and ask for a new ballot. You can request a new ballot at your early voting site until the Sunday before Election Day and at your clerk’s office until 4 p.m. on the Monday before Election Day.

 

If it’s Election Day, and your clerk has not received your ballot, go to your polling place, and tell a poll worker. You can fill out a simple form (called an affidavit) and get a new ballot.

PROBLEMS WITH YOUR EARLY VOTING SITE OR POLLING PLACE

 

What if I go to the wrong early voting site or polling place?

It’s a good idea to double check the location of your early voting site or polling place before you go to vote by going to mi.gov/vote and clicking on “Your voter information.” You can also call your city or township clerk and ask for your early voting site or polling place before you go vote.

If the poll workers tell you that you’re at the wrong early voting site or polling place, give them your address and ask them to double check. If you registered to vote but are not at the correct early voting site or polling place for your address, go to the correct location. If you are at the correct early voting site or polling place for your address, but you’re not on the list of registered voters, follow the directions in the next question.

 

What if I’m at the correct early voting site or polling place, but I’m not on the list of registered voters?

If you already registered to vote:

 

Step 1: Double check that you’re at the right place. Give the poll worker your address and ask if you’re at the correct early voting site or polling place. If you are at the wrong early voting site or polling place, go to the correct one.

 

Step 2: Show your receipt. You may have gotten a receipt when you registered to vote. If you have that receipt, show it to the poll worker. If you do not have that receipt, ask the poll worker to call the clerk to verify that you’re registered.

 

Step 3: Go to your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office. A good way to resolve a registration issue is to go to your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office. Some early voting sites may even have a satellite clerk’s office right in the same building. You can re-register there, if necessary, even on Election Day; just be sure to bring proof of residency if it’s within 14 days of the election or on Election Day.

 

Remember: if you registered to vote within 14 days of the election in any way other than in person with your city or township clerk, you will not be eligible to vote in this election. To be eligible to vote in this election, you must go to your city or township clerk’s office to register, with proof of residency.

 

Step 4. Ask for a provisional ballot at the early voting site or polling place. If you are at the correct early voting site or polling place and are unable to go to your city or township clerk’s office, ask for a provisional ballot. If you have a photo ID with your current address on it, your provisional ballot will be tabulated after you sign a simple form (called an affidavit) swearing that you registered to vote. If you don’t have a photo ID with your current address on it, the poll worker will place your ballot in a sealed envelope to allow time to verify that you are allowed to vote. You must then go to the clerk’s office within six days after Election Day to verify that you should have been allowed to vote. If you do this by the deadline, your ballot will be counted.

Did you register to vote within 14 days of the election in any way other than in person with your city or township clerk (for example, online or at a Secretary of State branch office)? If so, your registration is not yet valid. If you want to vote in this election, you must go to your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office with proof of residency. If this is your situation and you vote a provisional ballot at your early voting site or polling place, it will not be counted because your registration was not yet valid.

 

If you have not yet registered to vote: Go to your city or township clerk’s office or satellite office by 8 p.m. on Election Day and register to vote. Be sure to bring proof of residency. See How Can I Get Ready to Vote for more information.

 

What if someone is trying to intimidate or harass me?

You have the right to a safe voting experience. Follow these steps if someone tries to intimidate or harass you: 

Step 1. Tell a poll worker immediately.

Step 2. If the poll worker does not help you, or if the poll worker is the person trying to intimidate or harass you, call your city or township clerk.    

Step 3. If the city or township clerk doesn’t address the problem, call the nonpartisan Election Protection Hotline at (866) OUR-VOTE | (866) 687-8683.


What if someone challenges my right to vote?

If someone challenges your right to vote, follow these steps:

Step 1. Ask to be sworn in by the poll worker.

Step 2. Answer the questions necessary to establish your eligibility to vote.

Step 3. Vote.


What if I make a mistake on my ballot or the tabulator malfunctions?

Mistakes can happen, and the poll workers are there to help you. Here are some common issues and how to fix them.

If you make a mistake on your ballot: Ask for a new ballot right away before your ballot is inserted into the voting machine. You have the right to a new ballot.

If the tabulator rejects your ballot: Ask for a new ballot. You have the right to start over.

If the tabulator isn't working: You can place your completed ballot into a bin on the machine. The poll workers will insert your ballot into the tabulator once the machine is working again.

Remember: once your ballot is in the tabulator, you cannot get the ballot back.

What should I do if I encounter trouble voting?
Problems with your AVB
Problems with your EVS or poll
Download

Download the Know Your Voting Rights Guide

Call the Election Protection hotlines for assistance at any time.  

For assistance in English, call 866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683).
 

Para recibir ayuda en español, llama a 888-VE-Y-VOTA (888-839-8682). 

 

844-YALLA-US (844-925-5287) :للمساعدة باللغة العربية، اتصل على 
‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

For assistance in Bengali, Cantonese, Hindi, Korean, Mandarin, Tagalog, Urdu or Vietnamese call 888-API-VOTE (888-274-8683).

For additional information or questions, email: questions@michiganvoting.org.

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